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're watching al jazeera, i'm stephanie sy. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. hi, my name is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >>they share it on the stream. >>social media isn't an afterthought. it drives discussion across america. >>al jazeer
at www.america.aljazeera.com. i'm stephanie sy in new york. you're watching al jazeera news. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. there's more to financial news than the ups and downs of the dow. for instance, can fracking change what you pay for water each month? have you thought about how climate change can affect your grocery bill? can rare minerals in china affect your cell phone bill? or how a hospital in texas could drive up your healthcare premium? i'll make the connections from the news to yo
big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >> this is just the beginning of something much bigger. >> thank god i didn't have to suffer what he had to go through. >> this sunday, the premiere of "into eternity". >> i am now in this place where you should never come. >> how do you contain 100,000 years of nuclear danger? >> it is an invisible danger. >> al jazeera america presents "into eternity". premieres sunday night 9 eastern. ... s ... my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was
in the past 50 years we have witnessed what i'd like to call the nonviolent revolution in america, a revolution of values, a revolution of ideas, and our country is a better country. >> you know, the president will speak on wednesday in the same spot. he'll mark 50 years since the i have a dream speech. we've talked over the years, and you told me about a year and a half ago in your view a lot of people can't get comfortable with the idea of an african-american president even though what a testament to the progress and the dream that dr. king had. and you even said during your speech yesterday there are forces, there are people who want to take us back. what specifically are you talking about? >> well, i hear people over and over again saying we want to take our country back. take it back where? where are we going? we need to go forward. we've made so much progress. i often think -- when i was growing up, i thought it was science that said white men, colored men, white women, colored women, colored waiting, those signs are gone. when i first came to washington in 1961, the same ye
targeted in beirut. >>> you can always get the latest developments on our website, aljazeera.com/america. >>> in new jersey low levels of leak targeted a nuclear plant shut down. officials with the nuclear regulatory commission say, this is a quote, this is not a threat to the public, and the spill is confined. >>> jurors have resumed deliberations in the sentencing of nidal hand -- hasan. heidi security has been into the courtroom to be an observer, only 12 members of the media are selected daily. the rest of us have to watch this from a video feed. we have someone i'm sure you will let us know just as soon as we have a verdict. change you so much. >>> closing argument expected today in the case of sergeant bales. wednesday he took the stand and apologized for the attack. now a jury must decide whether his life sentence should also include the chance of parole. allen he apologized. any -- any sense of whether or not that willd bales a cold blooded killer. he said in a few hours he wiped out generations. he said there is only one appropriate sentence for something like that, and that's t
, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google and the world brain. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. mission. >>
nation, america is losing the battle against mary jane. this year new hampshire and illinois legalized medical marijuana bringing the to 20 the number of states where your pharmacist will soon look like this. (laughter) the dude prescribes. (laughter) and folks, the war on nugs used to have a strong ally on cnn's dr. sanjay gupta who opposed legalizing pot until now. >> i want to remind you that in 2009 you wrote a "time" magazine article entitled why i would vote no on pot. you changed your mind. >> i have. and as part of, you know, my thinking, the reason, i have apologized for some of the earlier reporting because i think, you know, we've been terribly and systemically mislead in this country for some time. and i did part of that misleading. >> stephen: wait a second, we were misinformed by a cable news doctor? (laughter) next you'll tell me i can't get directions to my cousin's house from fareed zakaria's gps. come on fareed, less on syria, more on how i get to where greg lives. (laughter) it's bad enough that is an jay gupta or as i now call him ganja soupta, okay-- (laughter) a g
for equality and economic progress and issued a challenge to america -- to live up to its democratic ideals. how does america measure up today? i'll ask our guests, civil rights pioneer and georgia congressman john lewis, mayor of newark, new jersey, cory booker, and develop nor of louisiana, bobby jindal. also, we'll explore the overall state of american dream -- civil rightses, the struggle of the middle classes, issues at the heart of our political debate. our roundtable weighs in. host of msnbc's "politics nation," the reverend al sharpton, pulitzer prize-winning journalist sheryl wudunn, republican congressman from idaho, raul labrador, and unique perspective from historian doris kearns goodwin as well as "new york times" columnist david brooks. i'm david gregory. all that ahead on "meet the press" this sunday, august 25th. good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous i have a dream speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secreta
. mer "america tonight" is next. >>> what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. would probably be very good at that also. that is it for al-jazeera america. >>> and welcome back. late summer heat wave has prompted many schools across the events. heat stroke is a leading cause of death among athletes, and it is a particular concern for high school football players and their parents at this time of year. one high school in georgia set up new rules after a devastating loss for their te
were killed. those are the headlines at this hour. america tonight is up next. you can get the latest news online at al jazeera.com. i will see you at 11:00 eastern time. >> on america tonight, now it's all in the timing. washington sends its firmest signals yet that it intends to act. >> they are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we say. >> back to school and adding up the risks. chicago students seek safe passage to class. >> it be glasses on the floor and the drugs. you have to walk through all of that danger and it's very carry. >>> also tonight, losing control. a burst of heat threatens to fuel a new round of california wildfires. ♪ >>> and good evening, thanks for being with us, i'm joie chen. while the timing remains a mystery, the white house laid down some clear markers about the actions against syria. both president obama and his chief diplomat, secretary of state john kerry had high confidence that the syrian government used chemical weapons against its own people and set fairly clear guidelines in place about how it intends to
much america's diminishing influence throughout the middle east. one of the reasons the gulf states radio angry with the united states not only because of what happened today in egypt. it's because they see the president is weak on iran, weak on syria and israeli settlements and now they feel -- >> all of the leff village gone. >> and now they are stepping in and they have the means to do it. >> thank you both very much. >> thank you. >> online we have a map that shows where all u.s. military aid guess. still to come on "the news hour," al-jazeera america has its debut. same sex marriage in the states. the dolphins day at the white house. and lyme disease on the rise. first the eerp news of the day. >> pakistan's former president the some point in time be was smrmt there to -- weep have a report narrated by john gla armed personnel were stationed around the courthouse. this was not a moment that mush would treasure. he seemed reluctant to get out of his vehicle. but the country's former military ruler had little choice. he had been summoned to court. prosecutors were ready to indict
. >>> thanks for watching. i am del walters. america tonight is next. we begin with america tonight. [ sirens ] >> we have a male black, blue hat, jersey and blue jeans, he was last seen going southbound. >> 15 years old. going southbound. >> it's like no other place in the united states. the heat, the intensity. the militarization. and the shear level of violence can often feel like a combat zone. in chicago, 72 people were shot, 12 killed. >> he was shot multiple times. >> in 2012, chicago led the nation with 500 people murdered. that's almost 100 more than killed in new york, a city three times its size. >> every single corner in that neighborhood is a drug corner. every single one of the. >> mike shield is a veteran cop who used to work chicago's west side. he's a curled member of the police officers' union. >> how would you describe chicago to people who don't know about it. >> it's almost like you're in a different country. it's almost like a third world. i know nationally people are talking when chicago, but the areas where the gun violence is going on isn't an area that a tourist woul
with the president. and that day, i'll tell you, our work paid off. people came from all over america. some americans living abroad flew home to participate in the march. people came from almost every state, people from idaho, wyoming, montana, church groups, labor groups, student groups, just plain, everyday individuals. >> rose: and what did your heart say to you when you heard martin luther king say, "i have a dream?" >> when martin luther king jr. got to that place in that speech and said, "i have a dream today, a dream deeply rooted in the american dream," i knew he was preaching and he was really preaching. he knew it himself. he turned those marble steps of the lincoln memorial into a modern day pulpit and the crowds were with him. jackson did a song how we got over, how we got over, and the whole place just rocked and rocked. >> rose: let me give you some timeline. april 16, dr. king writes his famous letters from a birmingham jail, and responded to white alabama ministers who urged him to end the demonstration. on june 12 medgar edgars was assassinated. what did you end that day with that yo
. ♪ mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> al jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. introduces america tonight. >> in egypt police fired tear gas -- >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. >> they risk never returning to the united states. >> we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. with an autographed jersey, and obama shared a few praise. >> coach shula retired with more wins than any coach in history. each time that record has been challenged, team after team has fallin short. >> michael eaves joins us to talk more about that. the president was having a lot >>> welcome back to "inside story." nasa scientists say the destructive power of these fires is here to stay and will likely get worse. earlier i spoke with nasa scientist douglas morton and asked him about how this current season fits
america - a new voice in american journalism - >>introduces america tonight. >>in egypt, police fired teargas at supporters of the ... >>a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. [[voiceover]] they risk never returning to the united states. >>grounded. >>real. >>unconventional. [[voiceover]] we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. >>an escape from the expected. >>i'm a cancer survivor. not only cancer, but brain cancer. ♪ [ cheers ] content while setting new standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> the horrors of solitary confinement in prison on movies and television, on shawshank redemption, and hbo's oz. whatever it's called, with he all know it's a place you don't want to go. >> i want to protect you. ple you out of that one bunk and cast you out with the sodomites. >> to take a closer look at solitary,
is an only in america story and it is an amazing tale of entrepreneurship. you don't want to miss this. >>> then a big question that affects us all, for the first time in history, a majority of human beings now live in cities. what does that mean? more skyscrapers and congestion? more detroit? we'll look at the upsides and the down sides of an ever more urban world. we've got a terrific battle that has some surprising ideas. >>> also, "les miserables." it turns out that the book by victor hugo is the all-time favorite novel of a middle eastern leader that the west counts as an enemy. i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. we are watching a season of discontent in a world of young democracies, from egypt to turkey to brazil. protest marches and one coup. as we watched the turbulence around the world, i think about our own democratic journey and how interesting it is that the distinctive feature of the american system is not how democratic it is, but rather, how undemocratic it is. hear me out -- we have three co-equal branches of government. and the one with the final say on man
claude mckay, fats waller, duke ellington. america experienced and said, we like the style of these people. they enjoyed it, adopted it, integrated it. and exploited it. the popularity of black style and culture soon spread throughout the country. it was not enough for black folks to be artistically admired. black folks wanted and demanded full participation in the social, political, and economic life of american society. that attitude set the stage for the civil rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. on wednesday, august 28, 1963, 300,000 people -- 80% of them black -- marched on the nation's capital as did before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come -- and stood before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come. celebrating the past is good. but without a vision for the future, we will never move beyond that past. in 2008, america was ready for an intelligent and articulate black man to sit in the oval office. he brought not only his intelligence, but some swagger into the white house. the reality is
syria. >> translator: >> this is part of america's plan to divide the middle east it started with iraq and now syria and this is an israel's interest. tra*p>> translator: it happenedn iraq and maybe in syria and maybe egypt. >> reporter: the syrian government promised to defend themself against attack. the fire in syria won't stop at its borders. al jazeera, beirut. >> the tinspection team in syria could take two weeks to release its report but the u.s. will wait on findings -- will it wait on findings before launching any attack. james is at the u.n. the ambassadors of the five members of the security council on their way to a meeting. this wasn't a formal session along the horseshoe table the final court of international security. the place where historically so many decision about global war and peace have been taken. instead, the last of the arrive at a meeting of the u.s. secretary general with the ambassador of the country will take security council. the weapons inspectors have made good progress taking samples of witness statements inside syria at the sight of the chemical attac
talked to him on the program in depth. this is three hours. >> host: what does america owe blacks? >> guest: well, it owes them an acknowledgment of what happened. we don't like to talk about that in the states. even blast history month. there's a truncated version of what woodson had in mind. now it starts in slavely and moves forward and cuts us all from any access to african history. which was not what woodson intended. and so we obviously owe the value of our hire to those people who suffered so much and their families who dissented from those people who worked for 246 years for nothing. we owe them something for that. we owe them the story. we have been asked to expect that people can survive in good sound, psychology health. ashes and obliterated history. when i was a dmield richmond, virginia, we used to have a phrase that we used all the time from here to tim. but nobody knew what it was. nobody knew the providence of the world. didn't know where it was. didn't know it was a place. tim buck, which was a cross roads. it was also a site of one the world's first university. a
. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google
? >> stephen: really? is that really who you want to burn down with, america? (laughter) yeah, sure, you thought it was funny when your friend said dude, let's get the dog high. but how funny will it be when he says dude, let's eat the dog's penis. now who are the kids going to look up to at cnn? wolf blitzer, you're our only hope. but at least, folks, there are some celebrities we can still look up to thanks to stories like this. >> john malkovich usually not cast as a hero but is being credited with helping safe a man, real life. the acker helped a 77-year-old man who tripped on the sidewalk and then slashed his throat on some scaffolding. widnesses say that malkovich ran over, applied pressure to the man's neck and waited for an ambulance. >> stephen: truly heroic. and it is malkovich so probably a little creepy. and he is not hollywood's only hero. >> there was no special effects. it was the real thing when actor ryan gosling clutched a woman from the path of a speeding taxist when a 17-year-old flipped his mustang t was patrick dempsey to the rescue prying the boy out. >> does tin h
for our pre game report. what is coming up on tonight's show? >> thanks, america's sweetheart. you are as adorable as ever. >> thank you. >> some members of the 1972 miami dolphins will be skipping a white house ceremony about their win. tonight's outrage hating panel is outraged. and a new poll which ask is the hottest, the dumbest, the craziest and more. our panel will insult all of you at one point or another. and sunny, the new portuguese water dog. i even want to hang out with the obamas on saturday night. >> thank you, we'll see you at the end. let's welcome our guest. despite what we put her through on this show she returns our e-mails and schools back. imogen lloyd webber. her latest book is called "the twitter diaries." and he is as talented as he is tall. it is jake fogelness. check it out on something called itunes. bill schulz. he thinks she on the set of "the good wife" right now. and proving that 99% in life is having a good name and great hair. next to me is buck sexton, not to be confused with the philanthropist. >> a block. the lede. that's the first story. >> what
bila for a pre game report. jedediah, what is coming up ongp tonight's show? >> thanks, america's sweetheart. you are as adorable as ever.v our top story, some members of ths e 1972 miami dolphins will be swimming a white house ceremonyny because they don't like obama's politics. welcome to the club, boys. are they principal and admirable or meanies out to hurt our president's feelings. >> and a new poll asks which are the hottest, dumbest,t, craziest and we will find out more. and finally you will meet sunny, the family's new dog. i even want to hang out with the obamas on saturday night. >> see you at the end. let's welcome our tabes. well, despite what we put herde through on this show for several years she still returns our e-mails asking her to come back. i am here with imogen lloydebbe webber. her latest book is called "the twitter diaries." and he is as talented as he is tall. she on the set of "the good wife" right now. and proving that 99% in life is having a good name and great hair. next to me is buck sexton, not to be confused with the philanthropist. >> a block. the
large scale hunger, malnutrition and starvation in america. >> scenes from across an increasingly dependent nation. this is fox news reporting, the great food stamp binge. i'm reporting from the u.s. department of agriculture. why the usda? for historical and political reasons, food stamps fall under the agriculture department's domain. in fact, food stamps will cost taxpayers a projected $78 billion this year. a staggering amount that's more than double the amount. other food asiftance. according to a just released poll, a majority of voters think most of the 46 million plus food stamp recipients are taking advantage and not truly in need. you heard stories of food stamp waste, fraud, and abuse. this hour we will also look at the cost of the recipients and the american character. during this show, you can share your thoughts via twitter. use #fox news reporting. we begin in new york city where one of the biggest proponents is looking to get more people signed up. >> individuals have a certain income limitation. >> you are watching a team of determined activists. preparing their p
the news to your money real. jazeera america. >> i'm kim bondy, growing up in news was always important. you have this great product that you are ready to share with the country. i'm a part of a team that is moving in the same direction. content while setting new standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> technology is coming on in the next few decades may make nuclear waste obsolete. we should all hope that's the case. but right now the international atomic energy agency expects the united states alone to produce at least 32,000 tons added to the pile. my next guess has made a documentary about the nuclear waste time will will air on al jazeera. if the problem can't be solved by new technology. it's directed by michael madsen who we will see in this clip explaining what it's all about. >> i am now in this place where you should never come
, thank you very much. more news on al jazeera. "america night" is next. >>> two opposeing forces in a deadly struggle for power. ordinary egyptians and journalists call with pressure on the media. are we getting the full picture? >> also tonight, behind bars, the battle over the new orleans prison. who should control it? and who should pay for it? "america tonight" gets rare access to one of the most dangerous prisons in america. >>> and cancers unlikely enemy. how doctors have a cure with another deadly disease. >> she's like what? you're putting polio in my daughtedaughter's brain? are you serious? >>> hello. and welcome to "america tonight". we watch day by day the toll in egypt grow and become more vicious and we wanted to get a clearer sense what it's like for ordinary egyptians that it's tk*e divided after two years of turmoil. we sent and despite threats and attacks and great restrictions on the movements. >> reporter: when we arrived in cairo, the city was on fire. thousands of demonstrators had set the capitol in defiance of the newest -- the muslim brotherhood supporter
unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, latest online at aljazeera.com. ♪ >> it is a desperate gamble for millions of immigrants trying to cross the u.s.-mexico border. people will risk their own lives even that of their children for the opportunity. america tonight's rob reynolds traveled to the border areas to hear from the survivors about their challenges. some of the images in the stories they tell may be disturbing. >> reporter: a corner of the cemetery in texas is set aside for th the lost and left behind. these are the graves of unknown migrants from mexico and central america who died lonely deaths in the bad lands of south texas. >> it's horrible. it's senseless death. i don't really understand it. >> reporter: vinnie martinez is chief deputy sheriff of brooks county last year he reported well over 100 dead migrants. today
>>> good morning, america. and at this hour, momentum building for an american strike on the syrian armed forces. responsible for the chemical attack. the crucial phone call intercepted between those responsible, as the u.n. asked for more time to get weapon inspectors out. >>> i have a dream. >> 50 years after the march on washington. and one of the most famous speeches ever made, the president returns to the lincoln memorial today, with a renewed call on race equality in america right now. >> free at last. >>> breaking overnight. michael douglas and catherine zeta-jones separate after almost 13 years. insiders reveal the a-listers are taking a break. what's driven one of hollywood's high-wattage couples apart? >>> and meet the new american teen phenom shooting to stardom overnight. her father once trapped under the rubble of a massive earthquake, cheering her on. this morning, victoria duval's cinderella story. >>> and good morning, america. so many developments happening right now. this just in, the first confirmation from the u.n. team in syria. that civilians were attacked by a
of justice flickered. it never died. because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. because they marched, the voting rights law was assigned. because they marched, doors of opportunity in education swung open so their daughters and sons could imagine a life for themselves beyond washing someone else's laundry or shining someone else's shoes. because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed. eventually the white house changed. [cheers and applause] because they marched, america became more free and more fair. not just for african-americans, but for women and latinos. asians and native americans. catholics, jews, and muslims. for gays, for americans with disabilities. america changed for you and for me. the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an iron curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside south africa would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. [cheers and applause] those are th
.vitac.com >>> tonight, pot in america. >> i think its deserves some respect, so i always call it cannabis. >> the biggest cash crop in the u.s. should it be legal? should it be taxed? is it a gateway drug that leads to addiction. >> without question, i think legalizing marijuana would be a huge mistake. >> taking you to the front lines of the battle, the beverly hills woman that said lighting up makes them better moms. >> i feel like i'm more interactive with my children. >> and i ask dr. sanjay gupta how dangerous is it really? >> every 19 minutes someone dies of prescription drug overdose but doesn't happen with marijuana. >> and what really happens inside a medical dispensary. >> the clinic is run like a typical health clinic. it's beautiful inside. >> this is the special report gone to pot, america's marijuana obsession. >>> good evening. the fight over pot grows, so does the use. recently washington d.c. opened the first medical marijuana dispensary, with other states that legalized it more medical uses. should it be a crime? we'll take a closer look tonight. >>> also, dr. sanjay gup
the nation. 1963od with dr. king in when he called on america to be true to its principles. five years later, dr. king stood without me in the sanitation workers of local 1733 demanded justice, dignity and respect. the journey for civil rights, workers rights and economic rights began almost in the moment america was born. it gained new momentum on these steps 50 years ago. it advances whenever the disenfranchised and disillusioned standup, fight back and march forward. because our struggle continues, we come to this but mario not only to commemorate -- this memorial, not only to commemorate the past, but to shape the future. we have a power to carry determination, hope and passion of the march on washington forward. we must also have the courage. when must also have the courage. in the name of dr. king, a philip randolph, bayard rustin, john lewis. on behalf of those whose names will never be known. we must recommit to the struggle as stewards of a nation that belongs to the rich and the poor , to the ceo and the sanitation worker, those with and those without. we have the responsibility to
. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and you know, tonight, even though there is something called a baseball game out there, but these wonderful events that we have in the city whether it's america's cup whether it's fleet week, whether it's the 49ers playing or the giants playing, even eventually when we land the superbowl it all board of trustees all of us, i know that what i'm doing as a mayor and making sure that i support smallbitions in the cit
to work. how would dr. king see the current racial situation in america? >> it took guts to do that then. and it's going to take guts to finish the job now. >> it is the collapse of the traditional family that is wreaking havoc in the african-american community. >> i stand here today in this sacred place in my father's footsteps. >> the other issue is racial profile acvoter identification requirements. while somewhat important are essentially a sideshow, a sideshow. a sideshow. >> stand tall in your community. fight for diversity. understand its strength. >> sideshow. >> you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out. and get in the way! make some noise! >> and i don't think our society will rise to its full maturity until we come to see that the men are made to live together as brothers. >> sideshow. if dr. king were alive today, i believe he would be brokenhearted about what has happened to the traditional famil family. >> good to have you with us tonight. thanks for watching "the ed show" right here 5:00 monday through friday. chris matthews is at 7:00. stick around to watch his show. bi
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